Whitney Palmer

Healthcare. Politics. Family.

No Such Thing as Big Data in Health Care

Published on the Dec. 3, 2014, DiagnosticImaging.com website

When it comes to big data, health care doesn’t really have any. And, for radiology, that’s a good thing. Small and medium data will work just fine – especially for testing and designing new reimbursement models, according to speakers at this year’s Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting.

Industry experts at this year’s RSNA say the data hospitals and health care systems already have can help providers identify ways to maximize their influence in the design of any future payment models.

“We’re currently in the lowest life form of payment policy. We get paid for events – it’s a transactional delivery system,” said Richard Duszak, MD, vice chair for health policy and practice, department of radiology and imaging sciences, Emory University School of Medicine. “Increasingly, we’re moving to models where we’ll be paid by encounters and engagements.”

The question, he said, is how those models will be designed to ensure radiologists receive appropriate reimbursement for services rendered in a correctly incentivized way. To date, there’s no clear-cut answer, but there are steps radiologists can take – armed with small-to-medium data – to ensure their seat at the decision table.

To read the article in its entirey at its original location: http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/rsna-2014/no-such-thing-big-data-health-care

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January 1, 2015 Posted by | Healthcare | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Successful Social Media Campaigns in Radiology

Published on the Oct. 30, 2014, DiagnosticImaging.com website

By Whitney L.J. Howell

For radiologists, social networking isn’t about status updates, posting pictures, or sending out tweets. It’s about sharing information and staying connected with patients, colleagues, and referring physicians – and it’s a necessity in today’s healthcare environment.

In fact, according to a recent study published in Academic Radiology, social networking is one of the most effective patient-engagement arrows radiologists have in their quiver. And ignoring it could put radiologists in a more isolated position.

“The alternative is that a radiologist becomes less connected compared to their colleagues, a dangerous situation in the current competitive healthcare environment,” wrote lead study author William Auffermann, MD, PhD, a cardiac imaging radiologist at Emory University School of Medicine. “Consequently, online social networking services are a vital aspect of a radiologist’s career and may be readily incorporated into one’s daily practice.”

Having a social networking presence is particularly vital when misinformation, such as incorrect data about radiation dose, can spread rapidly online.

Read the article in its entirety at its orginial location: http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/practice-management/successful-social-media-campaigns-radiology

October 31, 2014 Posted by | Healthcare | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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